The NYC studio owned by Warhol and where Basquiat died is available for rent for $60,000 a month.

The Manhattan estate owned by Andy Warhol and where Jean-Michel Basquiat lived, worked, and died is now available for rent.

Basquiat occupied the second floor of 57 Great Jones Street from 1983 until his death five years later in 1988, a year after the death of his mentor and landlord Warhol in 1987.

The space served as Basquiat’s main studio and where some of his most important paintings were made.

The historic building on Great Jones Street, between Lafayette and Bury, can be rented for $60,000 per month for a minimum of 10 years.

The second floor of the two-story NoHo building has “an open attic space with high ceilings and multiple skylights,” says Meridian Capital Group, which lists the property.

Before Warhol owned it, the property served as the headquarters of notorious criminal Paul Kelly’s Five Points Gang.

In the building, Kelly—described by The New York Times in 1912 as “perhaps the most successful and most influential mobster in New York history”—was meeting influential politicians.

In 1904, a fatal shooting took place on the first floor of the “Salon” buildings.

The property recently housed a referral-only Japanese restaurant called Bohemian, and according to the new listing, a “fully equipped restaurant space with ventilation and gas” has been installed.

The listing also shows photos of the interior of the historic building, which despite being a commercial space is equipped with luxurious furnishings.

The two-story building on Great Jones Street in Nou was where Jean-Michel Basquiat worked and lived, and before that it was the home of the Five Points Gang.

The two-story building on Great Jones Street in Nou was where Jean-Michel Basquiat worked and lived, and before that it was the home of the Five Points Gang.

The commercial property is now fitted with high end furnishings including a bar

The commercial property is now fitted with high end furnishings including a bar

The property features polished concrete floors and exposed brick walls.  The arch that used to connect the space to the adjacent building was filled in with breezy masses

The property features polished concrete floors and exposed brick walls. The arch that used to connect the space to the adjacent building was filled in with breezy masses

“The second floor consists of an open attic space with high ceilings and multiple skylights,” the listing boasts

Basquiat remained in the building until Warhol’s untimely death in 1987, when he became convinced that the Warhol estate was planning to evict him.

The deed to 57 Great Jones Street was signed by Andy Warhol

The deed to 57 Great Jones Street was signed by Andy Warhol

Just a year later in August 1988, Basquiat died of a heroin overdose on the premises at just 27 years old.

In 2016, the Village Preservation, an architectural preservation society, installed a plaque on the building commemorating the artist, which reads Basquiat’s paintings and other works that challenge established notions of high and low art, race and class, while crafting wise language that defies characterization. “

The exterior of the building was often covered in graffiti – a medium that first made Basquiat famous.

According to New York City property records, the building was sold by Andy Warhol Associates in the late 1980s.

New York Supreme Court records indicate that the sale sparked a legal dispute between 57 Great Jones Street Associates and Andy Warhol Enterprises, Inc over the separation of 57 Great Jones Street and adjacent 342 Bowery Street, which is also connected and owned by Warhol.

Jean-Michel Basquiat (left) moved to the second floor of 57 Great Jones Street in 1983 shortly after meeting Andy Warhol (right).  The two are pictured here while attending an event in New York City in 1984

Jean-Michel Basquiat (left) moved to the second floor of 57 Great Jones Street in 1983 shortly after meeting Andy Warhol (right). The two are pictured here while attending an event in New York City in 1984

The space is equipped with a commercial kitchen and according to Meridian Capital Group has ventilation and gas

The space is equipped with a commercial kitchen and according to Meridian Capital Group has ventilation and gas

The second upstairs floor in the building is where Basquiat worked, lived and eventually died at the age of just 27.

The second upstairs floor in the building is where Basquiat worked, lived and eventually died at the age of just 27.

The exterior of the building was often covered in graffiti - a medium that initially made Basquiat famous.

The exterior of the building was often covered in graffiti – a medium that initially made Basquiat famous.

According to New York City property records, the building was sold by Andy Warhol Associates in the late 1980s

According to New York City property records, the building was sold by Andy Warhol Associates in the late 1980s

In 2016, the Society for the Preservation of Architecture, the Village Preservation Society, installed a plaque on the building to commemorate Basquiat.

In 2016, the Society for the Preservation of Architecture, the Village Preservation Society, installed a plaque on the building to commemorate Basquiat.

In the early 1900s, the building hosted the ‘New Brighton Athletic Club’, which served as the headquarters for the infamous Paul Kelly’s Five Points Gang – one of the most dominant street gangs in New York City history in which Lucky Luciano and Al Capone were both . Individuals.

Born Paolo Antonio Vaccarelli on the Bowery in 1876, Paul Kelly changed his name to be associated with the politically influential politicians in New York at the time.

Although he began his career as a boxer in the late 19th century, Kelly’s interest soon turned to prostitution and the highly lucrative brothel trade.

After a stint in prison he founded the Paul Kelly Society which had its headquarters in Great Johns Street. He used the building to house a two-story café and ballroom where he drank wine and dined from New York’s political elite.

A New York Times article dated November 24, 1905, described the fatal shooting of gang member Wee Harrington in Kelly’s Saloon the day before.

The article begins “Murder early yesterday morning in the fight in Paul A. Kelly’s Saloon, 57 Great Jones Street, committed in a nest of houseboats is the result indicated by the police inquiry.”

The news story states that after the shooting, Paul Kelly went missing from the building. It was later speculated that “Paul A. Kelly,” the owner of the place, had been missing since the fight.

“The police have his cap showing a bullet hole in the crown, and they think he may have been hit in the fuse in which Harrington was killed, and that he had been hidden away by his friends until he could recover from his wounds.”

Leave a Comment