Tropical Storm Tracking: Turbulence May Affect Florida

The National Hurricane Center has reported an area to watch over the Atlantic Ocean and some have suggested it could affect Florida, and here’s what to know: A non-tropical low-pressure area is expected to develop this weekend in the southwest Atlantic. Some subtropical, or even tropical, development is possible as it moves from north to northwest. It’s too early to know what he’ll do. It will be one to watch next week as it drifts toward the southeastern United States. No major development is expected with this drop, but it is expected to bring wind, rain and storm conditions to Central Florida by Tuesday that could last as long as Thursday. Coastal parts of Central Florida may experience beach erosion, coastal flooding and rough surf, according to meteorologist WESH 2. In Volusia County, officials issued a warning Thursday about the potential for the storm to threaten its coast. They said residents living on the coast should monitor the disturbance closely and begin preparing immediately. County officials there said the storm’s potential impacts include strong rip currents, high waves and breaking waves up to 12 feet. Because the coast has already been damaged and eroded by Hurricane Ian, Emergency Management Administrator Jim Judge said, “This new system that’s headed our way could significantly threaten those properties with further erosion.” Moreover, Volusia County officials urged residents and visitors to stay offshore this weekend until early next week. The Weather First Alert Team is tracking turbulence should it occur, meanwhile Tropical Storm Lisa and Hurricane Martin continue their activity. Learn what to do when a hurricane clock strikes Stay tuned for WESH 2, WESH.com or NOAA Weather Radio for storm updates Prepare to bring along any lawn furniture, outdoor ornaments, ornaments, trash cans, hanging plants, or anything else the wind might pick up Inside the home, understand hurricane forecast models and cones. . If shutters are not installed, use pre-cut plywood, check batteries and stock canned foods, first aid supplies, drinking water and medication, and WESH 2’s First Alert Weather Team recommends that these items be ready before a storm strikes. : 1 gallon of water per person per day Canned food and soup, such as beans and chili, Cans cans can be opened without easy-open lids Assemble a first aid kit Enough prescription medicine for two weeks, and baby/baby needs, such as fixtures and diapers Children, flashlight and batteries Weather radio What to do when a hurricane warning is issued Listen to the advice of local officials. If advised to evacuate, leave, complete preparation activities, if not advised to evacuate, stay indoors away from windows, watch out for hurricanes. Hurricanes can occur during a hurricane and after it has passed. Stay indoors, in the center of your home, in a windowless closet or bathroom. How your smartphone can help you during a hurricane Your smartphone can be your best friend in a hurricane — with the right sites and apps, you can turn it into a powerful tool to guide you through the storm’s approach, arrival, and beyond. Download the WESH 2 News App for iOS | Enable Emergency Alerts – If you have an iPhone, select Settings, then go to Notifications. From there, find Government Alerts and enable Emergency Alerts. If you have an Android phone, from the app’s homepage, scroll to the right along the bottom and tap on Settings. In the Settings menu, tap Severe Weather Alerts. From the list, choose from the most severe, moderate, or all alerts. If you must evacuate, the most important thing you can do to protect your pets is to evacuate them as well. Leaving pets, even if you try to provide them with a safe place, can result in injury or death, so contact hotels and motels outside your area to see if they take pets, and ask friends, relatives, and others outside the affected area. Whether they can house your animal.

The National Hurricane Center has reported an area to watch over the Atlantic Ocean and some have suggested it could affect Florida.

Here’s what you need to know:

A non-tropical area of ​​low pressure is expected to develop this weekend in the southwest Atlantic. Some subtropical, or even tropical, development is possible as it moves from north to northwest. It’s too early to know what he’ll do.

It will be one to watch next week as it drifts toward the southeastern United States.

No major development is expected with this drop, but it is expected to bring wind, rain and storm conditions to Central Florida by Tuesday that could continue into Thursday.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

Coastal parts of Central Florida may experience beach erosion, coastal flooding and rough surf, according to meteorologist WESH 2.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

In Volusia County, officials issued a warning Thursday about the potential for the storm to threaten its coast. They said residents living on the coast should monitor the disturbance closely and begin preparing immediately. County officials there said the storm’s potential impacts include strong rip currents, high waves and breaking waves up to 12 feet.

Because the coast has already been damaged and eroded by Hurricane Ian, Emergency Management Administrator Jim Judge said that “this new system that’s headed our way could significantly threaten those properties with further erosion.”

Moreover, Volusia County officials urged residents and visitors to stay offshore this weekend until early next week.

The weather first alert team tracks the disturbance if it occurs.

while, Tropical Storm Lisa And the Hurricane Martin Continue to be active.

Learn what to do when a hurricane watch releases

  • Stay tuned to WESH 2, WESH.com, or NOAA Weather Radio for storm updates.
  • Be prepared to bring any garden furniture, outdoor ornaments, ornaments, trash cans, hanging plants, or anything else the wind might pick up.
  • Understand hurricane forecast models and cones.
  • Get ready to cover all the windows of your home. If shutters are not installed, use pre-cut plywood.
  • Check batteries and stock up on canned foods, first aid supplies, drinking water, and medicines.

The WESH 2 First Alert Weather Team recommends that these items be ready before a storm hits.

  • Bottled water: 1 gallon of water per person per day
  • Canned foods and soups, such as beans and chili
  • Can opener without lids, easy to open
  • Assemble a first aid kit
  • Prescribed medication for two weeks
  • Baby/baby needs, such as formula and diapers
  • Flashlight and batteries
  • Battery powered weather radio

What to do when a hurricane warning is issued

  • Listen to the advice of local officials. If you are advised to evacuate, leave.
  • Complete preparation activities.
  • If evacuation is not recommended, stay indoors away from windows.
  • Be alert for hurricanes. Hurricanes can occur during a hurricane and after it has passed. Stay indoors, in the center of your home, in a closet or in a windowless bathroom.

How your smartphone can help you during a hurricane

A smartphone can be your best friend in the event of a hurricane — with the right sites and apps, you can turn it into a powerful tool to guide you through the storm’s approach, arrival, and beyond.

Download the WESH 2 News app for iOS | Android

Enable Emergency Alerts – If you have an iPhone, select Settings, then go to Notifications. From there, find Government Alerts and enable Emergency Alerts.

If you have an Android phone, go from the app’s homepage to the right along the bottom and tap on Settings. In the Settings menu, tap Severe Weather Alerts. From the list, select from the most severe, medium, severe, or all alerts.

Pets and animal safety

Your pet should be a part of your family plan. If you must evacuate, the most important thing you can do to protect your pets is to evacuate them as well. Leaving pets, even if you try to provide them with a safe place, can result in injury or death.

  • Contact hotels and motels outside your immediate area to see if they take pets.
  • Ask friends, relatives, and others outside the affected area if they can house your animal.

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